Home » Book Reviews » Book Review: X-Men: Evolution #1-4

Book Review: X-Men: Evolution #1-4

WRITER: Devin Grayson

ARTWORK & COLORS: UDON with Long Vo, Charles Park & Saka of Studio XD

LETTERS: Randy Gentile

EDITORS: Ralph Macchio, Brian Smith, Joe Quesada, Jeff Youngquist, Jennifer Grünwald

PUBLISHER: Dan Buckley

BOOK DESIGN: Patrick McGrath

“You have no idea what it means to me to be a part of something like this.”

“Maybe I do, kid … maybe I do.”

(Scott Summers/Cyclops and Logan/Wolverine, X-Men: Evolution #2)[1]

“At first when I got to the Institute, I liked being at school better, because that’s where I felt smart and competent … and at the Institute, I’m always kind of intimidated by how amazing and cool everyone is. But I’ve decided I like having people around me to look up to. I think it makes me a better person, and there’s so much to learn.”

(Kitty Pride/Shadowcat, X-Men Evolution #4)[2]

I grew up watching X-Men: Evolution; it’s to that show and to the X-Men films that I owe my love of this superhero team. The series aired from 4 November 2000 to 25 October 2003 and lasted for four seasons (consisting of a total of fifty-two episodes), and it was a regular part of my Saturday mornings. Less well known is the comic book series based on the show, which was released in 2002; there were only ever nine issues released. I read the first four issues (which are collected into one book) years ago and decided to find and read the last five recently out of nostalgia. This review contains my thoughts on issues #1-4. The next will contain my thoughts on issues #5-9 and overall impression.

Issue #1 “Lines in the Sand” introduces us to the characters Professor Charles Xavier, Ororo Munroe/Storm, Logan/Wolverine, Magneto, and Mystique. Ororo is Professor Xavier’s first recruit, after he sees her using her powers to help someone. Logan is approached by both Professor X and Magneto and decides to go with Xavier and Ororo. Professor X, Ororo, and Logan build the school and look for their first student. It’s a nice introduction, and we immediately see some of the disagreements between Professor X and Magneto that have become a staple of the X-Men stories. We get some sweet moments from Ororo and Logan that make us immediately like them. Everything happened a little too quickly, perhaps because the creators were in a rush to get the school open and start adding students.

Issue #2 “Seeing Clearly” is when we meet Scott Summers, the first teenage student at the Xavier Institute. He’s at a hospital in Alaska, after accidentally blowing the roof off the orphanage where he lives. Professor Xavier shows up, pays the cost of the damage, gives Scott his signature ruby quartz visor that helps him control his powers, and takes him to the Institute to become one of the X-Men. This issue is really sweet, as we see the ever-optimistic Scott having hope for a better future despite being targeted for suspicion and fear, as well as being grateful for the chance to live at the Institute and have a future. There’s a nice moment when Logan, who had previously been skeptical about Scott’s ability to be an X-Men (calling him “that ridiculously polite pollyanna who won’t last a week”), realizes he was wrong after the two of them stop a crime together. These two characters, often depicted as rivals and reluctant allies with very different personalities and values, are shown to have something in common, as being part of the X-Men means a lot to both of them.

Issues #3 “Hearing Things” introduces us to Jean Grey, who is having trouble controlling her telepathic and telekinetic powers. The X-Men welcome her to join them and Professor Xavier starts tutoring her on how to control her abilities. There’s an odd moment when Logan think that Jean is beautiful (perhaps a reference to him liking her in other X-Men stories) but it’s thankfully not brought up again. We see Jean go to her first day at Bayville High School, where Scott (who clearly has a crush on her) is showing her around. She starts reading everyone’s thoughts unintentionally and runs home. There’s a nice conversation between Jean and Ororo, with them talking about their experiences with their powers, and then a funny scene with Jean and Scott flirting while the professor is in the same room. Later, Jean and Scott go on a field trip and have to save everyone when Todd causes the school bus to crash. In the processes, Jean has to try to control her powers to figure out what’s going on. The field trip was a bit of an odd choice, I thought; the same effect (Jean having an experience in which she had to control her powers) could have been done in a different way, in a different scenario. Overall, it was an alright introduction to Jean, showing her getting used to her powers and making new friends who understand her.

Issue #4 “Am I Blue” starts with the six teenage main characters (Scott, Jean, Rogue, Kitty, Kurt, and Evan) already living at the Institute and focuses on Kurt’s acceptance of his mutation. It was nice to see the characters together. There’s a training session in the Danger Room that was attempting to incorporate some serious and funny elements, but it came across as trying a little too hard. Later conversations between Kurt and Kitty were sweet and got the same points across much better. The ending shows Kurt handing in a school assignment and is rather amusing. Accepting oneself as a mutant is one of the staples of the X-Men stories, and Kurt is an appropriate choice for that plot. There is also a random but hilarious yoga session (taught by Ororo and Logan) towards the end of the issue.

Overall, in the first four issues, we mostly meet some of the characters for the first time with fun moments. There are moments of unintentional hilarity in some of the passages that are trying too hard, but also some genuinely sweet moments that make the characters interesting.

[To read the second part of my two-part review of the X-Men: Evolution comic book series, click here.]

[Originally Written: 10 July 2014]

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References

[1] Grayson, Devin; Udon Studios; et al. #2: “Seeing Clearly”. 2002. In: X-Men: Evolution, Vol. 1. Marvel, 2003.

[2] Grayson, Devin; Udon Studios; et al. #4: “Am I Blue”. 2002. In: X-Men: Evolution, Vol. 2. Marvel, 2003.

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